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Septic System Overview

 

Is it time to pump your septic tank?

More than 25 million homes, or almost 25% of the U.S. population, dispose of domestic wastewater through onsite septic treatment systems. A septic system is a “mini water treatment plant”. So, in a very practical way, you are your own wastewater treatment manager and are responsible for its operation and maintenance. While many homeowners don’t give a second thought to what happens once something goes down the drain, safeguarding the treatment process of your septic system is essential for many reasons. The EPA recommends pumping your tank every 3 to 5 years, depending on how many people live there and the size of the system.

Why should I maintain my septic system?

A septic system that is properly designed, installed, and maintained will effectively reduce or eliminate most human health or environmental threats posed by pollutants in household wastewater. However, they require regular maintenance or they can fail. Septic systems need to be monitored to ensure they work properly throughout their service lives.

Saving money

A key reason to maintain your system is to save money! Failing septic systems are expensive to repair or replace, and poor maintenance is often the culprit. Regular maintenance is a bargain when you consider the cost to repair or replace your entire system.

Protect your home investment

An unusable septic system or one in disrepair can lower property values and pose a legal liability. To sell your home the septic system has to be in good working order.

Protect the health of your family, community, & the environment

The safe disposal of sewage prevents the spread of infection and disease, and protects groundwater resources. Wastewater can hold viruses, bacteria and other pollutants from household waste and cleaning solutions. Inadequately treated sewage can be a cause of groundwater contamination, posing a significant threat to wells and drinking water.